About the Bears Ears Commission of Tribes

Breaking new ground, the Bears Ears National Monument Proclamation established the Bears Ears Commission of Tribes to integrate Native voices into land management of the Bears Ears region. As the proclamation states, the Bears Ears Commission of Tribes will “ensure that management decisions affecting the monument reflect tribal expertise and traditional and historical knowledge.” The Bears Ears Commission of Tribes consists of appointed and elected officials from the Hopi Nation, Navajo Nation, Ute Mountain Ute Tribe, the Ute Indian Tribe, and the Zuni Tribe. The Bears Ears Commission of Tribes is intended to engage with the Secretaries of Interior and Agriculture, “in the development of the management plan and to inform subsequent management of the monument.” The Bears Ears Commission of Tribes holds a vision of a Bears Ears National Monument that is a landscape of healing for all Americans and a symbol of Native American and community engagement in our nation’s public lands.

About the Bears Ears National Monument

On December 28, 2016, the 1.35 million-acre Bears Ears National Monument in southeastern Utah was established by presidential proclamation. This new monument protects one of the most significant and dense cultural landscapes in the United States, with more than 100,000 archeological sites and countless areas of spiritual significance. It is a place many Native peoples in the Four Corners area continue to define as home, soul, and the setting for the cultivation of cultures. The Bears Ears Commission, in collaboration with our federal agency partners, is engaging with the collaborative management model established by the proclamation to make the Bears Ears National Monument a place where the wisdom of traditional stewardship is combined with the best of federal land management to ensure that the land and its heritage resources are well cared for, forever, for all Americans.